5 Questions With: Casey Brown

This week, I had the opportunity to try downhill mountain biking for the very first time at Crankworx in Whistler Blackcomb. One of the top athletes in the sport in British Columbia’s own Casey Brown. She was on the World Cup circuit for several years before continuing her journey with Crankworx and working on tons of rad creative projects related to the sport. She is just about to start filming a new project in the mountains around Revelstoke and will be heading to Italy for the last round of the Enduro World Series. She was also part of the Women in Action Sports forum presented by Red Bull just last night in Whistler and took some time to answer a few questions below.

1) What first got you interested in downhill mountain biking? 

What got me interested in mountain biking in the beginning was my brother, he was my main inspiration, I saw that mountain biking gave him so much freedom and reward with his progression and I wanted to follow in his footsteps.

2) You were part of the Downhill World Cup circuit for quite some time, how much has the sport and circuit evolved since you initially joined? 

I’ve seen a big progression in the World Cup circuit, on the female side the bar has been consistently rising and the way they ride has changed to be more aesthetically pleasing (chicks are riding with better style now).

3) You’re part of the Crankworx tour and though you won’t be biking this weekend due to an injury, how do you usually prepare for such an event? What does your training regime look like these days? 

For Crankworx my training regime is always changing for the events that are coming up. If I’m racing an Enduro, I’ll have to get my cardio up and if I’m doing Whip offs, I’ll need to spend some time on big jumps. I do incorporate yoga and gym time as much as I can.

4) Do you find there’s a growing and supportive community of women in the sport at the moment?  

I’ve seen a decent growth on the women’s side of the sport, when you see more chicks on big teams, it’s a good sign that companies are figuring out the value in having female influence.

5) For those who have yet to try mountain biking or for young riders, what is the one piece of advice you would give them? 

My one piece of advice is have fun with it, you don’t necessarily need to race or be the best, just have a good time with the wind in your hair!

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